Index
Facebook
Twitter
Bookmark and Share
Map
Philadelphia College of
Osteopathic Medicine
4170 City Ave
Bala Cynwyd
Philadelphia, PA 19131
Cross Street: Monument Road
215.871.6100
General Information
For more than a century, PCOM has trained highly competent, caring physicians, health practitioners and behavioral scientists who practice the "whole person" approach to care.

When osteopathic schools were forming throughout the country in the 1890's, two students at the Northern Institute of Osteopathy in Minneapolis, the Rev. Mason W. Pressly and Oscar John Snyder, targeted Philadelphia as a futurePhiladelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Graduation home for an osteopathic college. While the "City of Brotherly Love" had a rich history of medicine, it had but one "osteopathist" by the time Pressly and Snyder graduated in 1898 and 1899, respectively. The two doctors of osteopathy (DOs) followed through with their vision, incorporating the Philadelphia College and Infirmary of Osteopathy (PCIO) on January 24, 1899. They rented two rooms in the Stephen Girard Building at 21 S. 12th Street. The first of many homes for the College opened their doors to students and patients. In September 1899 the first PCIO degree was awarded to a transfer student; the first PCIO "class," comprised of one woman and one MD, graduated in February 1900. It was not long before the early graduates formed the Alumni Association.

  • DO: DOs are complete physicians who, along with MDs, are licensed to prescribe medication and perform surgery in all 50 states. But DOs bring something extra to the practice of medicine. Osteopathic physicians practice a "whole person" approach to medicine, treating the entire person rather than just the symptoms. The focus is on a preventive health care, DOs help patients develop attitudes and lifestyles that don't just fight illness, but help prevent it, too.

    DOs are trained to be doctors first, and specialists second. The majority of DOs are family-oriented primary care physicians. Many DOs practice in small towns and rural areas, where they often care for entire families and communities.

  • Manipulative Medicine: DOs receive extra training in manipulating the musculoskeletal system - your body's interconnected system of nerves, muscles and bones that make up two-thirds of your body mass. This training in osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) provides osteopathic physicians with a better understanding of how an injury or illness in one part of the body can affect another.

    OMM is incorporated into the training of all osteopathic physicians. With OMM, DOs use their hands to diagnose injury and illness and to encourage your body's natural tendency toward good health. By combining all other medical procedures with OMM, DOs offer their patients the most comprehensive care available in medicine today.

  • Curriculum: The osteopathic curriculum involves four years of academic study, with an emphasis on preventive medicine and holistic patient care. DOs serve a one-year internship, gaining hands-on experience in family medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics-gynecology, pediatrics and surgery. This experience ensures that osteopathic physicians are first trained as primary care physicians plan to pursue a specialty. Many DOs then complete a residency program in a specialty area, which typically requires two to six years of additional training.
Copyright © 2007 - 2010 iLikePhilly.com All Rights Reserved